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ISOLOOP MAGNETIC COUPLERS

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ISOLOOP MAGNETIC COUPLERS

Postby Prasanth » Sun May 29, 2011 5:43 pm

Couplers, also known as "isolators" because they electrically isolate as well as transmit data, are widely used in industrial and factory networks, instruments, and telecommunications. Every one knows the problems with optocouplers. They take up a lot of space, are slow, optocouplers age and their temperature range is quite limited. For years, optical couplers were the only option. Over the years, most of the components used to build instrumentation circuits have become ever smaller. Optocoupler technology, however, hasn't kept up. Existing coupler technologies look like dinosaurs on modern circuit boards.

Magnetic couplers are analogous to optocouplers in a number of ways. Design engineers, especially in instrumentation technology, will welcome a galvanically-isolated data coupler with integrated signal conversion in a single IC. My report will give a detailed study about 'ISOLOOP MAGNETIC COUPLERS'.

When equipment using different power supplies is tied together (with a common ground connection) there is a potential for ground loop currents to exist. This is an induced current in the common ground line as a result of a difference in ground potentials at each piece of equipment. Normally all grounds are not in the same potential.
Widespread electrical and communications networks often have nodes with different ground domains. The potential difference between these grounds can be AC or DC, and can contain various noise components. Grounds connected by cable shielding or logic line ground can create a ground loop-unwanted current flow in the cable. Ground-loop currents can degrade data signals, produce excessive EMI, damage components, and, if the current is large enough, present a shock hazard.
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