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Bump Technology


Published on Nov 23, 2015

Abstract

This seminar report was created to assist developers in maximizing application performance on new Intel® graphics technologies, primarily focused on the new Intel® microarchitecture codenamed Ivy Bridge.

The document will introduce the new architecture and detail best practices with a focus on the DirectX 9, 10 and 11 APIs. Following the guidelines laid out in this document will help the developer’s game reach optimal performance on Intel processor graphics while providing a great gaming experience to the largest possible market.

As reported by Mercury Research in the second quarter of 2011, Intel’s combined integrated graphics line currently enjoys the largest market share, standing at 50.4% for desktop parts, 59% for mobile parts. With the introduction of the Intel microarchitecture codenamed Sandy Bridge, the graphics processor has moved onto the same die as the CPU, and is now referred to as “processor graphics”.

In addition, processor graphics has enjoyed numerous architectural improvements that yield significant performance improvements over previous generations of Intel® integrated graphics parts. The new generation of microarchitecture, codenamed Ivy Bridge, provides another jump in functionality and performance over Sandy Bridge microarchitecture.

Ivy Bridge microarchitecture is manufactured on the new 22nm process technology, incorporating Intel’s new tri-gate (or 3D) transistor technology. This innovative new process yields greater performance at much lower power. For example, the new tri-gate transistors exhibit 36% faster switching speed than the equivalent transistors on the legacy process at the same voltage. Tri-gate transistors also leak about 10x less current in their off state, resulting in a power saving of approximately 50% when using a comparable performance profile.

Vision and Goal behind Bump Application

Bump Technology

The applications and possibilities for bump are enormous .Bump was born as a simple iPhone app for swapping contact information created by our three founders, but as our user base grew, so did our vision.

We now have more than 75 million downloads, and a vision of changing the way people use their mobile devices. Our team includes some of the smartest and most talented developers and designers in Silicon Valley, and we all share a common goal: to build something people want and have fun doing it. Bump was part of Y Combinator's summer 2009 batch, and our growth has been fueled by some of the Valley's top investors and VCs, like Ron Conway, Ram Shriram, Sequoia Capital, and Andreessen Horowitz. We're based in downtown Mountain View, the epicenter of Silicon Valley, mere steps from Caltrain to San Francisco.

Amazing as the concept sounds, Bump allowed users to send contact information, photos, and other objects between phones. With version 3.0 however, only contact information and photos can be sent. Before bumping phones, each user confirms what he or she wants to send to the other user. To use the application, two people bump their phones together, and within about five to ten seconds, a screen appears on both users' screens allowing them to confirm what they want to send to each other. When two users bump their phones, the data is automatically sent through a separate internet server to the other user, which is able to detect when any two phones using the application bump each other. A newer aspect of the application allows two people to bump in order to become friends.

A big part of Bump is sending and receiving contact information, so Bump obviously accesses contacts you choose to bump to someone and also adds contacts you receive to the Contacts app on your phone.Also, each time you bump with someone new, the app uses the contacts in your phone's Contacts / Address Book to show you what friends you both have in common. You may opt out of this feature in the app's Settings.It works only in Android Application which is a Linux-based operating system for mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. It is developed by the Open Handset Alliance led by Google.

Google purchased the initial developer of the software, Android Inc., in 2005. The unveiling of the Android distribution in 2007 was announced with the founding of the Open Handset Alliance, a consortium of 86 hardware, software, and telecommunication companies devoted to advancing open standards for mobile devices. Google releases the Android code as open-source, under theApache License. The Android Open Source Project (AOSP) is tasked with the maintenance and further development of Android. Android has a large community of developers writing applications ("apps") that extend the functionality of the devices.

Developers write primarily in a customized version of Java. Apps can be downloaded from third-party sites or through online stores such as Google Play(formerly Android Market), the app store run by Google. As of February 2012 there were more than 450,000 apps available for Android, and the estimated number of applications downloaded from the Android Market as of December 2011 exceeded 10 billion.

Functionality

1. Transmit files, content, photographs, videos, personal or technical data or any other type of information or data (collectively, "Content") which is false, inaccurate, misleading, defamatory, or libelous;

2. Transmit any Content that you have no rights to, or for which transmission by you would constitute infringement of third party intellectual property rights;

3. Transmit identification documents or sensitive financial information of yourself or any other person;

4. Transmit any viruses, malicious code, Trojan horses, worms, corrupted files, or any other similar software that may damage the operation of another's computer, data or property, or transmit any other harmful or code technology;

5. Bully, intimidate, or harass any User or member of the public;

6. Transmit Content that is obscene, hateful, threatening, pornographic, or that contains nudity or graphic or gratuitous violence;

7. Use the Application, the Bump Services or the Site to do anything fraudulent, unlawful, misleading, malicious, or discriminatory;

8. Engage in any unruly, disruptive, unprofessional, or offensive conduct while using the Application, the Bump Services or the Site;

9. Violate any laws, third party rights, or any of our Policies (as defined below);

10. Engage in unlawful multi-level marketing, such as a pyramid scheme, using the Application, the Bump Services or the Site;

11. Transmit unauthorized commercial Content or commercial communications (such as spam) using the Application, the Bump Services or the Site;

12. Collect third party or our content or information, or otherwise access the Application, the Bump Services or the Site using automated means (such as harvesting bots, robots, spiders, or scrapers) without our express advance written permission;

13. Use the Application, the Bump Services or the Site to collect Content from users for commercial or any other kind of use without first obtaining their consent and first making it clear you (and not us) are the one collecting their Content, and posting a privacy policy explaining what Content you collect and how you will use it;

14. Do anything that could disable, overburden, or impair the proper operation of the Application, the Bump Services or the Site, such as a denial of service attack;

15. Facilitate or encourage any violations of these TOS; and

16. Use our Content or trademarks (including Bump and the Bump logo), or any confusingly similar marks (other than as part of your authorized use of the Application, the Bump Services or the Site), without our prior written permission.

We may remove and/or block transmission of any Content or information that you transmit using the Application, the Bump Services and/or Site if we believe it breaches the above representations and covenants. We may also, at our sole discretion, with immediate effect and without advance notice, restrict or terminate your access to the Application, the Bump Services and/or Site, upon your breach of any of the above representations and covenants. All judgments concerning the applicability of the above terms to your activity shall be at our sole and exclusive discretion.

Manufacturing Steps

• Integrated circuits are created on the wafer

• Pads are metalized on the surface of the chips

• Solder dots are deposited on each of the pads

• Chips are cut

• Chips are flipped and positioned so that the solder balls are facing the connectors on the external circuitry

• Solder balls are then remelted (typically using hot air reflow)

• Mounted chip is "underfilled" using an electrically-insulating adhesive

Reasons Google Bought Bump Technologies

1.Google gets more multitouch capabilities.

Yes, Google already has some multitouch functionality - much to Apple's chagrin - in its Google Android smartphones, but the addition of a three-year-old proven desktop software from Bump Technologies puts a new layer of icing on the multitouch cake. While Apple (NSDQ:AAPL) alread1. Google gets more multitouch capabilities. Yes, Google already has some multitouch functionality - much to Apple's chagrin - in its Google Android smartphones, but the addition of a three-year-old proven desktop software from Bump Technologies puts a new layer of icing on the multitouch cake.

While Apple (NSDQ:AAPL) already offers some multitouch capabilities like pinch-to-zoom and flick, BumpTop delivers some gestures that are specific to its 3D desktop software, like the ability to drag two fingers to focus on the desktop's back wall. Anything that can differentiate Google's multitouch capabilities from Apple's is a feather in Google's cap.y offers some multitouch capabilities like pinch-to-zoom and flick, BumpTop delivers some gestures that are specific to its 3D desktop software, like the ability to drag two fingers to focus on the desktop's back wall. Anything that can differentiate Google's multitouch capabilities from Apple's is a feather in Google's cap.

2. BumpTop could pave the way for a Google tablet

The acquisition of Bump Technologies could mean a touch-screen Google tablet, or "gPad," isn't just vapor or rumor. The BumpTop buy comes just as Apple reveals that it sold more than one million Apple iPad tablets since the device hit stores in early April. The ability to build a tablet around a 3D desktop interface gives Google a clear differentiator. And while the Apple iPad is the tablet to beat right now, a Google Android-based tablet, especially one built around BumpTop, could put a stick in Apple's spokes.

3. The Bump Technologies purchase is just one piece of Google's master plan.

Google has been paving the way dive head first into new markets. Along with Bump, Google this year has also acquired social search company Aardvark; hardware maker Agnilux; Microsoft Office collaboration suite DocVerse; video streaming company Episodic; game application and widget maker LabPixies; online photo editor Picnik; visual search provider Plink; and mobile email search provider reMail. While it's not 100 percent clear what Google plans to do with all of its newly-acquired technologies, one thing is certain: Google's plans go well beyond just a 3D multitouch desktop. Combined, Google's 2010 acquisitions have the muscle to build an unstoppable fleet of mobile offerings that tie in everything from video to search and from widgets to a multitouch desktop, with chips and document management thrown in for good measure.

References

[1] Dalrymple, Jim (April 24, 2009). "Meet Bump, the App Store's Billionth Download". PC World . Retrieved August 17, 2010 .

[2] All-Time Top 10 Free iPhone Apps". Business Insider. January 19, 2011.

[3] Segan, Sascha (April 24, 2009). "Review: Bump, the One Billionth iPhone App". PC Magazine Retrieved August 17, 2010 .

[4] Benderoff, Eric (April 24, 2009). "New iPhone app works by bump, not touch". Chicago Tribune Retrieved August 17, 2010 .














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