Seminar Topics

www.seminarsonly.com

IEEE Seminar Topics

Voice Portals


Published on Aug 15, 2016

Abstract

In its most generic sense a voice portal can be defined as "speech enabled access to Web based information". In other words, a voice portal provides telephone users with a natural language interface to access and retrieve Web content. An Internet browser can provide Web access from a computer but not from a telephone. A voice portal is a way to do that.

Overview

The voice portal market is exploding with enormous opportunities for service providers to grow business and revenues. Voice based internet access uses rapidly advancing speech recognition technology to give users any time, anywhere communication and access-the Human Voice- over an office, wireless, or home phone. Here we would describe the various technology factors that are making voice portal the next big opportunity on the web, as well as the various approaches service providers and developers of voice portal solutions can follow to maximize this exciting new market opportunity.

Natural speech is modality used when communicating with other people. This makes it easier for a user to learn the operation of voice-activate services. As an output modality, speech has several advantages. First, auditory input does not interfere with visual tasks, such as driving a car. Second, it allows for easy incorporation of sound-based media, such as radio broadcasts, music, and voice-mail messages.

Third, advances in TTS (Text To Speech) technology mean text information can be transferred easily to the user. Natural speech also has an advantage as an input modality, allowing for hands-free and eyes-free use. With proper design, voice commands can be created that are easy for a user to remember .These commands do not have to compete for screen space. In addition unlike keyboard-based macros (e.g., ctrl-F7), voice commands can be inherently mnemonic ("call United Airlines"), obviating the necessity for hint cards. Speech can be used to create an interface that is easy to use and requires a minimum of user attention.

For a voice portal to function, one of the most important technology we have to include is a good VUI (Voice User Interface).There has been a great deal of development in the field of interaction between human voice and the system. And there are many other fields they have started to get implemented. Like insurance has turned to interactive voice response (IVR) systems to provide telephonic customer self-service, reduce the load on call-center staff, and cut overall service costs. The promise is certainly there, but how well these systems perform-and, ultimately, whether customers leave the system satisfied or frustrated-depends in large part on the user interface.

Many IVR applications use Touch-Tone interfaces-known as DTMF (dual-tone multi-frequency)-in which customers are limited to making selections from a menu. As transactions become more complex, the effectiveness of DTMF systems decreases.

In fact, IVR and speech recognition consultancy Enterprise Integration Group (EIG) reports that customer utilization rates of available DTMF systems in financial services, where transactions are primarily numeric, are as high as 90 percent; in contrast, customers' use of insurers' DTMF systems is less than 40 percent.

Enter some more acronyms. Automated speech recognition (ASR) is the engine that drives today's voice user interface (VUI) systems. These let customers break the 'menu barrier' and perform more complex transactions over the phone. "In many cases the increase in self-service when moving from DTMF to speech can be dramatic," said EIG president Rex Stringham.